Light box continued – “The Little Red Hen” by Paul Galdone

redhenOk, I’ll be honest here, I didn’t use a book for this one, but then I felt guilty and thought I should do and with today’s activity being about flour, The Little Red Hen sprang to mind. Then I started thinking I should probably get hold of a copy before bedtime, so I can read it to them later and remind them about the flour we played with, but the chances of finding it on this short notice seemed slim, so I did some googling and found a youtube reading of it, hooray, so maybe we’ll have some screen time later: Little Red Hen read aloud

Continuing  from the last post, as we hadDSCN2463 the lightbox out still, I decided to experiment with other things on it. I’ve done salt before, for emergent writing, but with Bean still mouthing, I wasn’t ready for her to play with salt. I thought I’d try flour, they loved it. Jumbles started writing numbers, then moved on to drawing pictures and making handprints. Bean just enjoyed patting it and, annoyingly, flourlightbox 008throwing handfuls at me. She also grabbed a pom pom from the easter posting box that we’ve had out again while ill. She pushed it around making roads. Jumbles got a bit bored, till I suggested he got some cars, then he spent ages running them around roads,flourlightbox 002 delivering flour in a truck etc This does make a mess, obviously, but on a laminate floor it cleans easily.  I’ve included a photo to show how the flour does spread, but it really wasn’t too bad. It brushed off everything quite quickly. If I’d thought about it, I could have used an extension cable to move the lightbox away from the sofas, but then I’m still feeling a bit ill after getting the sick bug the kids had, so sitting on a sofa joining in was kind of part of the plan.

I’m not sure how necessary the light box is, but it’s nice revealing light when you draw and just makes a change from having the flour just in a tray. As an experiment, I turned the light box off, big mistake, it immediately ended Jumbles’s play, turning it back on did not regain his interest.

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Home made Light box activity – “Can’t you sleep Little Bear?” or other scared of the dark book

can'tyousleepThis isn’t really the right season for a light box activity, as you need it to be pretty dark. However, Jumbles is off preschool with a sick bug for the 3rd day running, and today it’s raining, so with the curtains shut we were able to get it dark enough to use the light box effectively, and I needed something that would keep him busy, as he doesn’t feel ill at all, so is just going a bit stir crazy. The book we used was “Can’t you sleep, Little Bear” which is a nice book about being afraid of the dark. However, you could use any book on the same subject, for example “The Owl who was afraid of the dark” (for older children really, though we do listen to an audiobook of it at bedtime) or no book at all if you just want to do the activity, to be honest, this is one of those where I wanted to do the acitivity anyway and then just looked for a book to link it to. We do have another book on the subject: “I want my light on” one of the “Little Princess” books. However, sadly that book has actually made Jumbles afraid of the dark and worried that ghosts are in his room! Step 1 – Make a lightbox, or buy one, but they are very expensive:lightbox I adapted these instructions from: The Imagination Tree. – Get a plastic box with a clear flat lid, ideally one with a slight lip on the edge to stop things sliding off. I used a “Really Useful” box which I had already, these are quite expensive unfortunately. – Stick greaseproof paper to the underside of the lid (this avoided me having to piece together sheets of tracing paper). – Line the sides with foil, to direct all of the light up and out of the top. – Inside the box place a set of christmas lights, you want white ones which are continually on, happily, these are generally the really cheap ones you can buy. I found that the cable was thin enough that it fitted out under the lid, without needing to drill any holes. Making the box hardly took any time at all, and I was fortunate enough to have everything I needed in the house already. I made it about a year ago (hence the slightly battered state of the foil inside, I store all of our “light play toys” in it (we have a few, light up windmills, an old “UFO” from my student days,  flashing wristbands etc) plus our emergency blanket and some sparkly material.lightbox 002 You can see, when I set up the lightbox, I always end up having to put the UFO out too, as Jumbles sees it and asks for it. Step 2 – Visit Poundland or similar Last week I was in there and spotted a set of plastic shotglasses in different colours and a set of coloured resuable “icecubes” – little cubes of soft plastic, filled with liquid, you stick them in the freezer and use in place of ice cubes in drinks. I knew these would be great for the lightbox. I wish I’d bought more cubes though. Hopefully they’ll still be in there if I go back, though I’ve noticed people selling them on ebay for £2. Basically collect things which are transparent coloured plastic. e.g. counters, magnetic letters etc. lightbox 017I kept it simple, giving them just the shot glasses and cubes, they spent nearly an hour, making towers, creating patterns, putting cubes in shot glasses etc. I did add our magnetic letters after a bit and a few pieces of coloured cellophane, but they just got in the way and weren’t being used, so I took them away again. Challenge for adults How big a cup pyramid can you make before your toddler knocks it down? I couldn’t get past the second storey. Though I did manage to make all of the cubes into a pyramid. There is something about building on the lightbox which is quite fun for kids and adults. I was also making Tetris patterns with the cubes. External links: Pictoral instructions for making Light box Buy “Can’t you sleep little Bear?” Borrow “Can’t you sleep little Bear?”