Oi Frog (Kes Gray & Jim Field)

oifrogThis book has captured our whole family’s hearts. It’s a very funny book, in which a cat tells a frog that he must sit on a log, because he’s a frog. He can’t sit on a chair as hares sit on chairs. The cat goes on to explain all of the different, ridiculous pairings of where animals sit. I realised how much everyone loved this book, a little too late; we returned our bag of library books just before Christmas, and neither child asked to renew any of them, then at bedtime, Bean excitedly asked for “Oi, Frog” and collapsed in tears when I said it was one that had gone back to the library. She’d obviously thought it was one of our own. We’ll have to buy a copy soon.

Anyway, the activity for this has evolved naturally, and been very much child led. We’ll be wandering around and suddenly one of us will shout “Oi frog, sit on a log” and we’ll all start calling out animals and things for them to sit on. Bean (2) doesn’t get the rhyming, but has memorised couplets from the book and throws these out. Jumbles (4) is getting good at coming up with his own rhyming pairs, and trying to catch us out with things that are very hard to rhyme.

So for today’s activity, simply read the book and play the verbal rhyming game. Or print out the cards I’ve made.

oi frog cards

There are 2 ways to use them…

1) Just use the animal cards, go on a family hunt sticking them on things around the house which they rhyme with
2) Play matching pairs with the cards, turn them all upside down and on your turn, turn 2 of them over. If they rhyme, you’ve won that pair. Note there are a few which have more than one matching possibility.

I added names to my set, with photo’s of the children, as Bean’s real name rhymes with something. Jumbles’s doesn’t, so I called him Jumbles (and rhymed with apple crumbles) if your child’s name rhymes, add it in.

 

Links

Buy “Oi Frog” from Wordery (affiliate link)

Borrow “Oi frog” from your local library

“Duck in the Truck” by Jez Alborough (Rainbow muck)

ducktruck This book has been a firm favourite in our house for the last couple of years. It’s actually grown on me, simply based on how much the rest of the family love it. It’s just this book everyone loves, not the rest of the Duck series though. The story is that a duck is driving home in a truck, the truck gets stuck in the muck, various other animals come along and try to help. The book is a very simple rhyme, with vivid illustrations and good use of humour.

This was a bit of a spur of the moment activity, we had just read the book and had a bit of time to kill before dinner, then I remembered that I had some rainbow smash in the fridge which I made as edible paint for a toddler group a couple of days ago and I figured it would work as muck.

Rainbow Smash:

For reasons I don’t quite understand, duckmuck 014whenever we go camping I buy a packet of emergency Smash (instant mashed potato), we never actually eat it, as we don’t really like Smash and can cope without having mashed potato while living in a tent. So anyway, I often have a packet sitting in the back of the cupboard going out of date, and periodically find a sensory play use for it.

You can play with the dry powder, with scoops and water, this is great fun as the kids can see the changes. However, this time we didn’t do that, as I already had batches made up. Either leave it as it is, or add a few drops of food colouring, it colours up really nicely and can then be used simply for exploring texture etc. Or can be used to do paintings.

On this occasion we did one of Jumbles’s favourite activities. Driving cars through something mucky. Now of course, you could just use real mud, or compost, for a more realistic muck to get the toy cars stuck in, but coloured muck adds a bit of interest and has the advantage of being edible, I don’t really like Bean eating too much mud (duckmuck 023she sneaks quite a bit in).

Jumbles was retelling the story without prompting as he played with the car in the muck. I also laid out some paper so that they could paint with the cars on the paper if they wanted, they didn’t really use it though.

Carwash:duckmuck 027
After playing with the cars in muck like this, you might simply clear everything away, but you’d be missing out on possibly one of the best and simplest activities. Simply bring a bowl with a small amount of soapy water and a couple of cloths or brushes (old toothbrushes work well) out and let the kids wash the cars. It saves on clean up for you later and they have fun, Jumbles asks to do car washes quite often, even if we haven’t got his cars dirty.

 External Links:
Buy “Duck in the Truck”
Borrow “Duck in the Truck” from your local library

“Each Peach Pear Plum” By Janet and Allan Ahlberg

imageA well loved classic, this simple rhyming book focuses on spotting fairy tale characters on each page. So we did a simple character hunt. I made cards for each character, then hid them around the house for the kids to find. peachJumbles loves doing treasure hunts and Bean was excited to find cards, Jumbles even passed her some (that’s what’s happening in the picture). If doing this for a larger group or older children, you could put letters or words on the cards to spell out a word or sentence and ask the kids to write down the letters/words they find instead of removing the cards when they find them, this way slower children still get to join in and not have all of the cards found. This is how we used to do treasure hunts when I used to work in libraries.

imageHere are the cards I made for the treasure hunt, simply print off, cut out and hide around. Sorry that I haven’t made better use of the page, I was rushing as always, as I suddenly came up with this activity while Bean was napping, so had to get it done in the few minutes that they were both quiet.

I then printed out several extra copies of 4 of the cards (as I thought all 10 was a bit many) and taught Jumbles to play snap, he enjoyed it, though he didn’t understand why he had to turn the top card over instead of looking through to find a pair. We also played matching pairs with the cards. Now I’ve got the cards I’m planning to use them for other games, like “Go Fish/Happy Families”. Admittedly buying a pack of cards is pretty cheap and less hassle, but we did this while we were still quarantined after the sick bug and I couldn’t find any full packs of cards in the house (mainly because Jumbles loved flicking through cards when a bit younger, sorting them etc, so a lot got damaged), plus I like them being related to stories.

I’m hoping to get the kids to decorate the backs of the cards with stamps or something, to extend the activity even further and to give them ownership of the cards.

External Links:

Buy Each Peach Pear Plum
Borrow Each Peach Pear Plum